27 SEPTEMBER – HAPPY WORLD TOURISM DAY

SOMETIMES you never know the value of a moment, until it becomes a memory. WE believe that your happiness strengthens and widens when you share it with others.

WHAT else can be more valuable & precious than delightful memories?? May be nothing…

MEMORIES are life long and cannot be stolen, depreciated in value or inflated by policies and even cannot be perished by time. In other words, everything is mortal or gets changed by time, but memories are those moments which were lived and enjoyed, are immortal forever. Things end but memories last forever with you and with your beloved ones. Memories never die.

THE best things in life are the people we love, the places we have been and the memories we have made along the way. Some memories are unforgettable, remaining ever vivid and heart-warming. Memories are timeless treasures of the heart.

I WISH TO ALL OF TOURISM PROFESSIONAL WITH WORLD TOURISM DAY TO MAKE POSSIBLE MEMORABLE JOURNEYS TO MILLIONS OF PEOPLE. HATS OFF TO ALL.

SHARAD KUMAR JINDAL & SANJEEV KUMAR VERMA

INDIA- AWAITING YOUR VISIT: Pay $25 for 30-day e-tourist visa

Tourism Minister Prahlad Patel also announced a 5-year e-tourist visa for a fee of $80 and 1-year visa for a fee of $40.

The move is to encourage foreign tourists to visit India.

Tourism Minister Prahlad Singh Patel on Tuesday announced that India will have e-visa fee for the peak as well as lean period for the travelers planning their visit to India on a short duration. 

“The e-visa fee for a duration of 30 days during the peak season — from July to March — will be $25. While, the e-visa fee during the lean period — from April to June — is to be kept at $10,” said Patel. 

Tourism Minister Prahlad Patel on Tuesday, August 20, announced that the India government will now offer a 30-day e-tourist visa for a fee of $25 during the peak tourism season between July to March.

News agency PTI reported that Patel also announced a 5-year e-tourist visa for a fee of $80 and 1-year visa for a fee of $40. “For Japan, Singapore and Sri Lanka lean period visa fee will be $10 and $25 for 30 days, 1 year and 5 years,” the minister said.

Patel further went on to say that during the off-season, which is from April to June, tourists will be able to get a 30-day e-visa for $10.

The move was to encourage tourists to visit India. Patel was speaking at the inauguration of a meeting with the state government.

The Ministry also introduced a five year e-tourist visa the fee of which will be $ 80 and the fees of one year e-visa would be $ 40. For Japan, Singapore and Sri Lanka, the lean period visa fee is $10 and to avail the e-visa for a period of 30 days, one year and five year the fees would be $25. 

The announcement was made by the Tourism Minister at the inauguration of State Tourism Ministers’ conference here on Tuesday. The Ministry also clarified that the visa fee reduction is under consideration of Ministry of External Affairs. 

Ракша Бандхан в Индии

Дата праздника уникальна для каждого года. В 2019 году эта дата — 15 августа .

Праздник Ракша Бандхан (Raksha Bandhan) или, как его чаще называют, Ракхи (Rakhi) приходится на день полнолуния месяца шраван (июль — август). 

В этот день на берегах рек, озер и прудов совершаются ритуальные омовения, в море, в качестве подношения Богу вод Варуне, бросают кокосовые орехи.

Ракша Бандхан имеет огромное значение для братьев и сестер. Главный ритуал праздника состоит из завязывания освященного шнурка «ракхи» на запястье брата. Этим сестра желает благополучия и процветания своему брату, брат же клянется защищать ее от всех бед и помогать во всех проблемах. 

Ракша Бандхан отмечается с огромной радостью по всей Индии. Приготовления к празднованию начинаются с самого утра. В этот день все предпочитают надевать национальную одежду. Мужчины, главным образом, надевают костюм «курта-паджама», женщины предпочитают надевать сари или «шалвар-камиз». По этому случаю готовят особые блюда, которые включают сладкие и соленые кушанья.

Для высших каст вообще и для брахманов в особенности Ракша Бандхан имеет важное ритуальное значение: в этот день ежегодно старые священные шнуры — важнейший кастовый признак брахманов — заменяются на новые.

INDIA’S MUCH TALKED CUSTOMS & TRADITIONS!

Indian Culture and traditions are something which has now become renowned all across the world.  We all refer to India and its culture as something very diverse and unique. But seldom do we give a thought to why things are done in certain specific ways. Indian Culture is full of several unique customs and traditions, which outsiders might find really intriguing. Most of these originate from the Ancient Indian scriptures and texts, which have dictated the way of life in India for thousands of years.

Here are 11 interesting Indian customs and traditions:

1. The Namaste

Probably the most important tenet of Indian Culture - the Namaste

Namaste! (Source)

The Namaste is one of the most popular Indian customs and isn’t really just restricted to the Indian territory anymore. You have Barack Obama, who has been seen doing it on various occasions, or you had Ban Ki-moon, the UN Secretary-General, greeting everyone with a namaste at the Times Square in New York on the first International Yoga Day. But, what’s the significance? The Namaste, or namaskar, or ‘namaskaara‘ is one of the five forms of traditional greetings mentioned in the ancient Hindu scriptures, the Vedas. It literally translates to ‘I bow to you’, and greeting one another with it is a way of saying ‘May our minds meet’, indicated by the folded palms placed before the chest. The word namaha can also be translated as ‘na ma’ (not mine), to signify the reductions of one’s ego in the presence of the other.

2. Always a Festive Season

Indian Culture - An amalgamation of several religions and culture

It’s always festive in India. (Source)

India also sees a large number of festivals, mainly because of the prevalence of diverse religions and groups. The Muslims celebrate Eid, the Christians have Christmas, good Friday and so on, the Sikhs have Baisakhi (harvesting of crop), and the birthdays of their Gurus and the Hindus have Diwali, Holi, Makar Sakranti, the Jains have Mahavir Jayanti, the Buddhists celebrate the Buddha’s birthday on Buddha Poornima, and quite honestly, the number is endless. All of these translate to holidays in our book, of course.

3. Joint Families

Concept of Joint Families - Significant part of Indian Culture

A Joint Family (Source)

Also, in India, there exists the concept of a joint family, wherein the entire family (parents, wife, children and in some cases relatives) all live together. This is mostly because of the cohesive nature of the Indian society, and also reportedly helps in handling pressure and stress.

4. Fasting

Fasting

 Fasting is an integral part of Hindu culture. Fasts or Vrats or Upvas are a way to represent your sincerity and resolve, or express your gratitude to the Gods and Goddesses.  People throughout the country observe fasts during various religious occasions. Some people also observe fast on different days of a week in favour of a particular God or Goddess associated with that particular day. It is widely believed that by doing so, you are depriving your body of a basic necessity and thus,   punishing yourself to cleanse off the sins that you have committed until the day of fast. The rules and regulations of a fast are in accordance with the particular occasion. The origin of fast probably comes from the  Vedic ritual of kindling the sacrificial fire for sacrifice purposes. Since the word ‘upvas’ has been used for denoting both fasts and kindling sacrificial fire, it can be thought that people observed fasts when they had to kindle or rekindle the domestic fires kept in their homes to perform daily sacrifices.

5. Holy Cow

sacredCow

Source

Cow, in the Indian culture, is considered to be a Holy animal. She is worshipped as a maternal figure and is a depiction of the bounty of Mother Earth. Lord Krishna, who grew up as cow herder is often depicted as playing his flute among cows and Gopis (milkmaids) dancing to his tunes. Interestingly, Lord Krishna is also known by the name of  ‘Govinda’ or ‘Gopala’, which translates to the ‘friend and protector of cow’. Hence, cows have an auspicious significance in Indian culture and religion. Even Lord Shiva’s trusted vehicle is Nandi- the sacred bull. Thus, feeding a cow or making contributions for cow shelters is of immense religious importance for Indians. The Vedic scriptures, in various verses, have emphasised the need to protect and care for cows. Cows are a source of life-sustaining milk. Even the cow dung is an essential and energy efficient source of fuel, especially in rural India. Killing the cow or consuming cow meet is considered to be a sin. Hence, several states in India have banned the slaughter of cows by law. Mother cow is, however, not worshipped as other deities. Indian culture and religion appreciate and expresses its gratitude towards this innocent animal who gives back to mother Earth and its people in more than one form.

Found Interesting?? That is not all. We shall upload other such unique customs & traditions of India very soon. Stay Tuned. Thanks ))

Rs 200 extra for Taj Mahal’s main mausoleum!!

In yet another ticket hike at Taj Mahal this year, visitors from Monday will have to pay another Rs 200 to enter the main mausoleum, which houses replicas of Mughal emperor Shah Jahan and his wife Mumtaz Mahal’s graves. Early this year, the entry charge for domestic tourists was increased from Rs 40 to Rs 50.

The move will hit domestic tourists the hardest, increasing their overall ticket price by five times (Rs 250), if they wish to see the grave replicas.

Meanwhile, foreign tourists and visitors from SAARC nations, who were already paying higher entry charges of Rs 1,100 and Rs 540, will also have to shell out Rs 200 more if they want to enter the main mausoleum, taking their overall ticket prices to Rs 1,300 and Rs 740 respectively.

Officials said the move is an initiative by the ministry of culture to implement step ticketing at Taj.

The primary notification in this regard was published by the ASI on September 14, 2018. The ASI had invited objections to the extra charge within 45 days.

The original graves of Shah Jahan and Mumtaz Mahal are located in the basement of the main mausoleum.

However, these are inaccessible to visitors throughout the year, barring the three days of Shah Jahan’s ‘Urs’ when the way to the basement is unlocked for devotees to pay obeisance to the Mughal emperor.

What the visitors get to see while visiting the Taj are the artistic replicas of these graves, located above the original resting place of the emperor and his wife.

World Boxing Championship won by India’s Mary Kom

                                         Chungneijang Mary Kom Hmangte – An Indian Olympic boxer

India’s MC Mary Kom won a historic sixth gold medal in world championships on 24-11-2018

Chungneijang Mary Kom Hmangte, better known as Mary Kom is an Indian Olympic boxer from Manipur. She is the only woman to become World Amateur Boxing champion for a record six times, and the only woman boxer to have won a medal in each one of the seven world championships.

Mary Kom, born on 1st March 1983, is famed as the only boxer to win a medal in every one of the six world championships. In the 2012 Olympics, she became the first Indian women boxer to qualify and win a bronze medal in the 51 kg flyweight category of Boxing. 

Mary was born in Kangathei, Manipur. She did her schooling from Loktak Christian Model High School, Moirang till class VI and studied in St. Xavier Catholic School, Moirang till class VIII. She then completed her schooling from NIOS, Imphal and did her graduation from Churachandpur College. Mary Kom is a mother of twin sons, Rechungvar and Khupneivar; and is married to K Onler Kom. She had an eager interest in athletics since childhood and the success of Dingko Singh is what really inspired her to become a boxer.

Career

Mary Kom’s career started in 2000 after her victory in the Manipur state women’s boxing championship and the regional championship in West Bengal. In 2001, she started competing at international level. She was only 18 years old when she made her international debut at the first AIBA Women’s World Boxing Championship in United States,winning a silver medal in the 48 kg weight category. In 2002, she won a gold medal in the 45 kg weight class at the second AIBA Women’s World Boxing Championship in Turkey. She also won a gold medal in the 45 kg weight category at the Witch Cup in Hungary in the same year.

In 2003, Mary Kom won a gold medal in the 46 kg weight class at the Asian Women’s Boxing Championship in India and in 2004 she won a gold medal at the Women’s Boxing World Cup in Norway. In 2005, she again won a gold medal at the Asian Women’s Boxing Championship in Taiwan and the AIBA Women’s World Boxing Championship in Russia both in the 46 kg weight class. In 2006, she won a gold medal at the Venus Women’s Box Cup in Denmark and won gold again at the AIBA Women’s World Boxing Championship in India.

After a one year break, Mary Kom returned in 2008 to win a silver medal at the Asian Women’s Boxing Championship held in India and won a fourth successive gold medal at the AIBA Women’s World Boxing Championship in China, both were in the 46 weigh category. In 2009 she won a gold medal at the Asian Indoor Games in Vietnam.

In 2010, Mary Kom won a gold medal at the Asian Women’s Boxing Championship in Kazakhstan and her fifth consecutive gold medal in the AIBA Women’s World Boxing Championship in Barbados. She competed in the 48 kg weight class because AIBA had discontinued using the 46 kg class. She also participated in the 51 kg weight class at the Asian Games and won a bronze medal.

In the 2010 Commonwealth Games held in Delhi, India. She had the honor of holding the Queen’s Baton along with Vijender Singh for the opening ceremony run in the stadium. However, she did not compete as women’s boxing event was not included in the Games. In 2011, she won a gold medal in the 48 kg weight class at the Asian Women’s Cup in China. In 2012, she won a gold medal in the 51 kg weight class at the Asian Women’s Boxing Championship in Mongolia.

The 2012 London Olympics brought her more respect and honor as she became the first Indian women boxer to qualify and win a bronze medal at the Olympics. She took part in the 51 kg weight category and also became the third Indian woman to win an individual medal at the Olympics. In 2014 Asian Games, she won a gold medal and created history for India. She won the gold in the women’s flyweight (48-52 kg) division which was her first gold medal in the Asian Games.

Journey Aravali Hill to Penang Hill

So it was a small but unforgettable time spent in penang hill as part of very well organised trip by Ghoom Lo Duniya.

GhoomLoDuniya is finest venture of human expertise launched by Monks & Monkeys Travels to make the abroad trips easier for Indian Nationals.

Coming back to the Penang Hill where we with a group of 56 explored Malaysia. It was Penang Hill which took the highlight. Set 821m above Penang’s capital, islanders call it Bukit Bendera and it is generally about five degrees cooler than Georgetown. It is the last patch of tropical rainforest in Penang so the flora and fauna here have been protected since 1960. It does not have the same prominence as Genting Highlands, Fraser’s Hill or Cameron Highlands but it is one of Penang’s best-known tourist attractions due to its fresher climate.

There is a food court called Sky Terrace where we sat 800 mtrs above the city and have some beer, where the live music was played as per our choice, there were other shops such as fruit and souvenir stalls, some gardens, an exuberantly decorated Hindu temple, a mosque, a police station, a post office: the original funicular train, built in 1897, is also on exhibit here.

 

Views from The Top From the top of Penang Hill.

On a clear day you can see the mountains of Langkawi and north Kedah but it is the night time sight of lit-up Georgetown that is especially rewarding. Most people simply come to enjoy the cool, unpolluted air and walk under 30 m-high trees along the nature trails. Additionally, over 100 species of birdlife, ranging from ordinary garden species to exotic deep forest inhabitants, call this hillside home. Two kilometres away from Bellevue Hotel is the Canopy Walk: this 220m walkway suspended between towering trees 30m above the dense jungle offers great views of the hillside. Opened in 2003, it was operational for a short time, and since then, due to its failure to attract sufficient customers, it has opened and closed without much announcement.

I hope you enjoyed reading the blog. Other videos and pictures would uploaded on the next blog. Stay Tuned.

Blogger: Punit Paliwal

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