Monthly Archives: November 2016

500, 1000 rupee notes cease to be legal tender.

Hello people,

Monks & Monkeys Travels have brought to you what’s new for the foreign visitors to India!

Well yes, the title says it all. Even we were shocked watching PM of India announcing on a news channel that from midnight 500, 1000 rupee notes cease to be legal tender.

If you are currently on a tour in India with us (monks-n-monkeys travels), You don’t need to panic even 1%. Our tourist guide with you is a problem solver.

For rest of the tourist :

You can change the notes at airports.

Secondly, Your 500 and 1000 rupee notes be accepted till November 11 at:

  • Petrol Pumps and government hospitals
  • Railway, airline, government bus  ticket booking counters
  • Consumer co-operative stores run by state or central government
  • Milk booths authorized by state governments
  • Crematoriums and burial grounds.

 

For Foreigners and Indian Nationals, all of your questions are placed and answered below. 🙂

1. Why this now?

There has been a rise in the incidence of fake Indian currency notes in higher denomination. More often that not, the common man fail to distinguish between original and fake notes. Fake notes are used for anti-national, illegal activities, misused by terrorists and for hoarding black money. As India remains a cash based economy and there is a rise in the circulation of fake Indian currency notes, the withdrawal has been introduced to contain the fake note circulation and to hurt those who keep unaccounted money.

Indian Currency

2. What exactly is this?

The legal tender character of the notes in denominations of 500 and 1000 stands withdrawn. In simple terms, all the 500 and 1000 rupee notes will be just paper, these cannot be used for transacting business and/or store of value for future usage.

 

3. How much is my Rs 500/1000 note worth now?

Your 500/1000 notes are worth its value till December 30, provided you deposit it in your bank account.

 

4. Can I get all in cash?

No. You will get up to Rs 4,000, per person, in cash and if you need more, you can get it credited to your bank account.

 

5. Why can I not get the entire amount in cash when I have surrendered everything in cash?

The scheme does not provide for it, given its objectives.

 

6. Rs 4,000 cash is insufficient for my need. What to do?

You can use mobile wallets, online payment methods, IMPS, debit/credit cards, and you can also pay by cheque.

 

7. What if I don’t have any bank account?

Don’t worry. Pick the bank of your choice, and get a bank account opened. Carry the necessary documents required for fulfilling the KYC requirements.

 

8. What if I have only a Jan Dhan account?

You can avail the exchange facility subject to the caps and other laid down limits in accord with norms and procedures.

 

9. Where can I go to exchange the notes?

You can exchange the notes at all Issue Offices of RBI and branches of commercial banks/RRBS/UCBs/State Co-op banks or at any Head Post Office or Sub-Post Office.

 

10. Will I have to go to my bank branch itself?

For exchange up to Rs 4,000 in cash you may go to any bank branch but do carry a valid identity proof.

For exchange over Rs 4,000, which will be accorded through credit to bank account only, you may go to the branch where you have an account or to any other branch of the same bank.

In case you want to go to a branch of any other bank where you are not maintaining an account, you will have to furnish valid identity proof and bank account details required for electronic fund transfer to your account.

11. Can I go to any branch of my bank?

Yes, you can go to any branch of your bank.

12. Can I go to any branch of any other bank?

Yes, you can go to any branch of any other bank. But in this case, you have to furnish valid identity proof for exchange in cash; both valid identity proof and bank account details will be required for electronic fund transfer in case the amount to be exchanged exceeds Rs 4,000.

13. I have no bank account but my relative / friend has an account, can I get my notes exchanged into that account?

Yes, you can do that if the account holder, that is your relative / friend, gives you permission in writing. While exchanging, you need to show this proof and your valid identity card at the bank.

14. Should I go to bank personally or can I send the notes through my representative?

It is better if you can visit the branch. In case you are sending a representative, do give him an express mandate, that is, a written authorisation. While tendering the notes, this representative will have to produce the authorisation letter and a valid identity proof.

15. Can I withdraw from ATMs?

ATMs and banks will remain closed on November 9. It may take a while for the banks to recalibrate their ATMs, and once it’s done, you can withdraw up to a maximum of Rs 2,000 per card per day till November 18. The limit will be raised to Rs 4,000 per day per card from the November 19 onwards.

 

16. Can I withdraw cash against cheque?

Yes, you can withdraw cash against withdrawal slip or cheque subject to ceiling of Rs 10,000 in a day within an overall limit of Rs 20,000 in a week (including withdrawals from ATMs) for the first fortnight, that is up to November 24, 2016.

17. Can I deposit withdrawn notes through ATMs, Cash Deposit Machine or cash Recycler?

Yes, notes can be deposited in Cash Deposits machines / Cash Recyclers but not on November 9.

18. Can I make use of electronic (NEFT / RTGS / IMPS / Internet Banking / Mobile banking) mode?

Yes, these facilities will come handy. You can use NEFT/RTGS/IMPS/Internet Banking/Mobile Banking or any other electronic, non-cash mode of payment.

19. How much time do I have to exchange the notes?

The scheme closes on December 30, 2016. The banknotes can be exchanged at branches of commercial banks, Regional Rural Banks, Urban Cooperative banks, State Cooperative Banks and RBI till this date.

If you fail to exchange these notes on or before December 30, an opportunity will be given at specified RBI offices. You will have to provide necessary documentation as specified by the Reserve Bank of India.

20. I am right now not in India, what should I do?

You can authorise someone who is in India by giving an authorisation letter and get the notes deposited into your bank account. This person will have to go to the bank on your behalf, with a valid identity card and your permission letter.

21. I am an NRI and hold an NRO account, can the exchange value be deposited in my account?

Yes, you can deposit the scrapped banknotes to your NRO account.

22. I am a foreign tourist, I have these notes. What should I do?

You can purchase foreign exchange equivalent to Rs 5,000 using these notes at the airport exchange counters within 72 hours after the notification, but you will have to present proof of purchasing these notes.

23. If I have an emergency (hospitalisation, travel, life saving medicines) and is in need of cash,then what should I do?

You can use Rs 500, 1000 notes for paying off your hospitalisation charges at government hospitals, for purchasing bus tickets at government bus stands for travel by state government or state PSU buses, train tickets at railway stations, and air tickets at airports, within 72 hours after the notification.

24. What is proof of identity?

Valid Identity proof is any of the following: Aadhaar Card, Driving Licence, Voter ID Card, Pass Port, NREGA Card, PAN Card, Identity Card Issued by Government Department, Public Sector Unit to its Staff.

 

So what else, that’s all!!

If you have any further question, comment below, we will get to you.

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Thanks.

Have  a nice time! 🙂

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Diwali with us!

Hey guys! Welcome back to our blog.

Today let us talk about the recent passed and everyone’s favorite festival “Diwali”. We had a good experience offering our foreign guests to live Diwali with us. So we decided to let people who could not make a trip to India this year know about this grand festival of lights. Diwali is one of the most colorful, sacred and loveliest festivals of India. It is celebrated every year with great joy and enthusiasm across the length and breadth of the country.

The shimmer of trillion lights, deep music that sounds from everywhere, plates full of delicious-smelling sweets in the hands of adults and children, the crackling of firecrackers and the glitter of sparklers, bustle of crowded bazaars / markets, this is the feast of the triumph of good over evil, a time of bright fire of generosity on the streets and in the hearts of all Indians.

diw

We at monks-n-monkeys have made some exclusive highlights of Diwali tour for our foreign guests: day after day and year after year. After analyzing previous years’ celebrations, we decided to redesign Diwali-tour like never before. So plan your tour to India on such a promising journey.

Tourist information about the holiday Diwali

At this time, people are out to buy new clothes and gifts for relatives. Because October-November is the most  favorable time for the fair. And  you can find chaotic holiday markets (regardless of whether you are in the north or south of India). Fabrics, sarees, sweets, nuts, art, souvenirs at affordable prices – all this can be bought in India in 5 festive days of the festival.

diwal

About the weather

October-November is the most favorable time to visit India. Days are dry and warm (25-30 degrees) and temperature drops to + 21 at night which is suitable for most of Europeans.

Date of festival

Start date of the festival changes every year because it depends on the lunar cycle. Diwali is celebrated exactly on the 15th day of the Hindu lunar month of Kartika.

The concept of the festival has a deep religious meaning. Hundreds of years ago,  after the 14 years of exile  the king of Ayodhya – Rama came back home after victory over evil,  people all around lit their homes  with earthen lamps to illuminate his way home, and have the opportunity to welcome the beloved king.  Since then, the Indians repeat  this tradition and illuminate their homes in a sign of the manifestation of spiritual light, the light of purification of the soul and heart.

Monetary concept:

Before the festival all Hindus are trying to finish old business, pay off debts. And then make new starts. The people of India believe that the ventures initiated in the week of Diwali prosper to greatest extent. People worship  the Goddess of wealth- Lakshmi and the God of auspicious beginnings- Ganesha.

 dawali.jpg

 The festival of lights lasts for five days.

And each day has its own name, and has a deep sense of ancient traditions and requires devoted  compliance with Hindu rituals and ceremonies.

THE FIRST DAY OF DIWALI.

DHANTERAS – the day of goddess Lakshmi,

All women of India on this day, clean up their home and decorate them in the best possible way and also lit diyas (lamp oil clay vessels) all over. It is believed that on this day goddess Lakshmi descends on earth and chooses to visit homes which are clean and beautiful with many lights and music.

Women pray, sing hymns to Goddess Lakshmi, praying her to bless their home with wealth and prosperity.

THE SECOND DAY. NARAKA CHATURDASHI – “Small Diwali”

Creative day of the festival. People put efforts in order to decorate around.  Rangoli is a projection of the fiery light to the earth. They make the likeness of a fiery glare on the pavement and lawns of flowers and rocks, spilling out of colored powders and bright sand, dyed rice or grain cereals.

diwal3

THE THIRD DAY. DIWALI, festival of DIYAS – the main day of the festival.

On this day people get together with family to light the lamps prepared before, to worship. And in the evening, they visit friends and family generously exchange sweet gifts and best wishes. The presence of relatives accompanied by mass celebrations, explosions of firecrackers and fireworks.

Diwali_Festival.jpg

Why so many crackers n fireworks without even caring of environment?

Well, from parents I heard a more “earthly” explanation of the use of fireworks during the festival. It turns out that November is the month of the breeding of dangerous insects that spread disease and often becomes the cause of deadly epidemics. Smoke, steam, noise from the blasting of firecrackers and the smell of incense helps to reduce their number.

FOURTH DAY. PADWA / Govardhan Pooja

The fourth day of Diwali celebrations is ‘Padwa’ or ‘Varshapratipada’. In the North India, it is called as Govardhan Puja. This pooja is performed with great zeal and enthusiasm and in the states of Punjab, Haryana, Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. In this pooja, there is a tradition of building cow dung hillocks, which symbolize the Mount Govardhan, the mountain which was once lifted by Lord Krishna. After making such hillocks people decorate them with flowers and then worship them. They move in a circle all round the cow dung hillocks and offer prayers to Lord.

THE FIFTH DAY-  BHAIDOOJ – a day of brotherly love

After the high voltage celebrations of Diwali, the festival of lights and fire-crackers, sisters all over India get ready for ‘Bhai Dooj’ – when sisters ceremonise their love by putting an auspicious tilak or a vermilion mark on the forehead of their brothers and perform an aarti of him by showing him the light of the holy flame as a mark of love and protection from evil forces. Sisters are lavished with gifts, goodies and blessings from their brothers.

Bhai Dooj comes every year on the fifth and last day of Diwali, which falls on a new moon night. The name ‘Dooj’ means the second day after the new moon, the day of the festival, and ‘Bhai’ means brother.

DIWALI1.jpg

Now if you think this tour takes all the boxes on your holiday checklist, go online to monks-n-monkeys travel.

For other mesmerizing destinations in India, visit our website and subscribe to our blogs and also like us on facebook.

If you have already traveled to India please comment below your views.

So that’s all for today, have a happy time 🙂 .